What Makes Jeonju Bibimbap So Special

What Makes Jeonju Bibimbap So Special

Jeonju is considered as the home of bibimbap, the famous Korean dish of rice with vegetables and beef. The rice used for bibimbap in Jeonju is cooked not in plain water but in beef broth so it looks and tastes better.

Bean sprouts, a key ingredient in Jeonju bibimbap, are Rhynchosia volubilis from Imsil, North Jeolla Province. Even if cooked for a long time, they do not get too mushy but retain their crispiness.

Bean sprouts are usually cooked in the last stage of rice cooking, and Jeonju bibimbap is usually served with clear bean sprout soup. Other vegetables like spinach, balloon roots, drop water and shiitake mushrooms are also included along with raw marinated beef and red pepper paste. This makes the dish healthy food, providing all the key nutrients in one bowl.

From chosun.com

How to make Kimchi

Kimchi History

Origin of Kimchi

For as long as humans have been cultivating they have enjoyed the nutritional elements of vegetables. However, the cold winter months, when cultivation was practically impossible, soon led to the development of a storage method knowns as ‘pickling’. Rich in vitamins and minerals, kimchi was conceived in Korea around the 7th century.

Use of Hot Red Pepper Powder

Many years ago, kimchi was merely regarded as a salted vegetable. Yet, throughout the 12th century, with the addition of several spices and seasonings, it grew steadily in popularity. It wasn’t until the 18th century that hot red pepper was finally used as one of the major ingredients for making kimchi. In fact, the very same kimchi as we know it today has retained the same qualities and cooking preparations that prevailed ever since it was first introduced.

The Origin of the Name, Kimchi

It is suspected that the name kimchi originated from shimchae (salting of vegetable) which went through some phonetic changes: shimchae – dimchae – kimchae – kimchi.

Reasons Why Kimchi Was Developed in Korea

Few fermented vegetable foods are found worldwide. Some possible reasons why kimchi was developed as a fermented food especially in Korea are as follows: (1) vegetables were popular to the ancient people in Korea whose main industry was agriculture; (2) Koreans had a remarkable technology for salting fish which was frequently used as a seasoning; (3) cabbages (brassica) appropriate for making kimchi were widely grown.

Major Historical Periods of Korea

The development of kimchi is reportedly rooted in the agrarian culture that began before the era of the Three Kingdoms on the Korean Peninsula. Due to the cold Korean winter, they had to come up with the storage technology for vegetables as a means of securing food.

Kimchi in Ancient Times

It is difficult to identify the development of kimchi throughout ancient times, as historical records remain scarcely available. We can only assume that they simply salted vegetables in order to preserve them as long as possible.

Kimchi during the Goryeo Kingdom

Although there are records that clearly indicate the root of kimchi’s discovery, cabbage was first mentioned in an oriental medicine book titled ‘Hanyakgugeupbang’. There were two types of kimchi – jangajji (sliced radish preserved in soy sauce) and sunmu sogeumjeori (salted radish). In this period, kimchi began to receive new attention as a processed food enjoyable regardless of season as well as storage food for winter. It is suspected that the development of seasonings at that time enabled spicy kimchi to appear.

Kimchi in the Joseon Period

It was after foreign vegetables, in particular, cabbages (brassica) were introduced and used as the main ingredient that the current form of kimchi was conceived. Hot red pepper was imported to Korea from Japan in the early 17th century (after the Japanese invasion of Korea in 1592), but it took roughly 200 years until it was actively used as an ingredient in kimchi. Therefore, it was only during the late Joseon period that kimchi became associated with its red color.

Modern Kimchi

Kimchi has been scientifically proven to be high in nutrition and is often recommended as a valuable food source both at home and abroad. In fact, there has been a significant increase in kimchi exports in recent years. Korean immigrants to China, Russia, Hawaii and Japan first introduced kimchi abroad, and have continued to eat kimchi as a side dish. It gradually gained popularity even among foreigners. Accordingly, kimchi may be found wherever Koreans live. In America and Japan especially, where relatively many Koreans live, packaged kimchi is easily available. In the past, the production and consumption of kimchi was confined to Korean societies, however, in recent years it has become a globally recognized food.

Kimchi History

Kimchi History

Origin of Kimchi
For as long as humans have been cultivating they have enjoyed the nutritional elements of vegetables. However, the cold winter months, when cultivation was practically impossible, soon led to the development of a storage method knowns as ‘pickling’. Rich in vitamins and minerals, kimchi was conceived in Korea around the 7th century.

Use of Hot Red Pepper Powder
Many years ago, kimchi was merely regarded as a salted vegetable. Yet, throughout the 12th century, with the addition of several spices and seasonings, it grew steadily in popularity. It wasn’t until the 18th century that hot red pepper was finally used as one of the major ingredients for making kimchi. In fact, the very same kimchi as we know it today has retained the same qualities and cooking preparations that prevailed ever since it was first introduced.

The Origin of the Name, Kimchi
It is suspected that the name kimchi originated from shimchae (salting of vegetable) which went through some phonetic changes: shimchae – dimchae – kimchae – kimchi.

Reasons Why Kimchi Was Developed in Korea
Few fermented vegetable foods are found worldwide. Some possible reasons why kimchi was developed as a fermented food especially in Korea are as follows: (1) vegetables were popular to the ancient people in Korea whose main industry was agriculture; (2) Koreans had a remarkable technology for salting fish which was frequently used as a seasoning; (3) cabbages (brassica) appropriate for making kimchi were widely grown.

Major Historical Periods of Korea
The development of kimchi is reportedly rooted in the agrarian culture that began before the era of the Three Kingdoms on the Korean Peninsula. Due to the cold Korean winter, they had to come up with the storage technology for vegetables as a means of securing food.

Kimchi in Ancient Times
It is difficult to identify the development of kimchi throughout ancient times, as historical records remain scarcely available. We can only assume that they simply salted vegetables in order to preserve them as long as possible.

Kimchi during the Goryeo Kingdom
Although there are records that clearly indicate the root of kimchi’s discovery, cabbage was first mentioned in an oriental medicine book titled ‘Hanyakgugeupbang’. There were two types of kimchi – jangajji (sliced radish preserved in soy sauce) and sunmu sogeumjeori (salted radish). In this period, kimchi began to receive new attention as a processed food enjoyable regardless of season as well as storage food for winter. It is suspected that the development of seasonings at that time enabled spicy kimchi to appear.

Kimchi in the Joseon Period
It was after foreign vegetables, in particular, cabbages (brassica) were introduced and used as the main ingredient that the current form of kimchi was conceived. Hot red pepper was imported to Korea from Japan in the early 17th century (after the Japanese invasion of Korea in 1592), but it took roughly 200 years until it was actively used as an ingredient in kimchi. Therefore, it was only during the late Joseon period that kimchi became associated with its red color.

Modern Kimchi
Kimchi has been scientifically proven to be high in nutrition and is often recommended as a valuable food source both at home and abroad. In fact, there has been a significant increase in kimchi exports in recent years. Korean immigrants to China, Russia, Hawaii and Japan first introduced kimchi abroad, and have continued to eat kimchi as a side dish. It gradually gained popularity even among foreigners. Accordingly, kimchi may be found wherever Koreans live. In America and Japan especially, where relatively many Koreans live, packaged kimchi is easily available. In the past, the production and consumption of kimchi was confined to Korean societies, however, in recent years it has become a globally recognized food.

Traditional Korean Food

Different Kinds of Traditional Korean Food

Bap (steamed rice) and Juk (porridge)
Boiled rice is the staple food for Koreans, it is eaten with almost every meal. In Korea people eat short-grained rice, as apposed to the long- grained Indian rice. Korean rice is often sticky in texture, and sometimes it is combined with beans, chestnuts, sorghum, red beans, barley or other cereals for added flavor and nutrition. Juk (porridge) is a light meal, which is highly nutritious. Juk is often made with rice, to which abalone, ginseng, pine nuts, vegetables, chicken, or bean sprouts can be added. As well as rice porridge, red bean porridge and pumpkin porridge are also delicious.

Guk (soup)
Korean meals traditionally consist of a soup served with rice. The soup can be made from vegetables, meat, fish, shellfish, seaweed, or beef bones.

Jjigae (stew)
Jjigae is similar to guk but is thicker and has a stronger taste. The most famous jjigae (doenjang-jjigae )is made from preserved soy bean paste. Jjigae is usually spicy and served piping hot in a heated stone bowl.

Jjim and Jorim (simmered meat or fish)
Jjim and jorim are similar dishes. Meat and fish are prepared with vegetables and soaked in soy bean sauce. The ingredients are then slowly boiled over a low heat.

Namul (vegetables or wild greens)
Namul consists of vegetables of wild greens, which have been slightly boiled or fried, and mixed with salt, soy sauce, sesame salt, sesame oil, garlic, onions, and other spices.

Jeotgal (seafood fermented in salt)
Jeotgal is a very salty food made from naturally preserved fish, shellfish, shrimp, oysters, fish roe, intestines and other ingredients.

Gui (broiled/barbecued dishes)
Gui is when marinated fish or meat are barbecued over a charcoal fire. The most popular gui dishes are meats, such as bulgogi and galbi, however, there are also many fish dishes which are cooked this way.

Jeon (pan-fried dishes)
Jeon is a kind of Korean pancake. Mushrooms, pumpkin, slices of dried fish, oysters, unripened red peppers, meat, or other ingredients are mixed with salt and black pepper, dipped in flour and egg and then fried in oil.

Mandu (dumpling)
Mandu are Korean dumplings, which are stuffed with beef, mushrooms, stir-fried zucchini, and mungbean sprouts. Pork, chicken, fish or kimchi are sometimes used instead of beef.

List of Korean Food

김치 (kimchi)
갈비 (galbi)
감자탕 (gam ja tang)
감자탕 (gam ja tang)
김밥 (kimbap)
김치찌개 (kimchi jjigae)
깐풍기 ( ggan poong gi)
냉면 (naeng myun)
닭도리탕 (dak do ri tang)
돈까쓰 (don katsu)
돌솥비빔밥 (dol sot bibimbap)
된장찌개 (dwen jang jjigae)
떡볶기 (dduk bbok gi)
라볶기 (ramyun + dduk bbok gi)
보쌈 (bo ssam)
부대찌개 (boo dae jjigae)
불고기 (bul go gi)
비빔밥 (bibimbap)
삼겹살 (sam gyup sal)
설렁탕 (sul lung tang)
순두부 찌개 (soon doo boo jjigae)
육개장 (yook gae jang)
잡채 (jap chae)
짜장면 (jja jang myun)
짬뽕 (jjam bbong)
차돌배기 (cha dol bae gi)
탕수육 (tang soo yook)